Big Data Cynthia Crossland October 18, 2018

TechNews: Parkinson’s Charity Leaps into the Cloud for a Cure

Sometimes it’s easy to forget that embracing big data in the cloud for smarter, data-driven decision making isn’t just about enabling business–it’s also helping organizations like Parkinson’s UK fight disease.

A couple of days ago, ZDNet ran an article on how the charity’s director of digital transformation, Julie Dodd, hopes a combination of big data and cloud computing will drive more collaborative research around Parkinson’s and bring about a cure. Cloud-based data warehousing, she says, will help various institutions share their research insights in real time while supporting centralization of data and greater data transparency.

Like many organizations, Parkinson’s UK had to deal with all the headaches related to GDPR, but being compliant was a big enabler for them in terms of working with supporters. “It’s allowed us to create a clear sense of who we have consent to talk to, when, and what sort of things they want to hear from us.”

Waterline’s take? Cloud computing will become a $411B market by 2020 (according to Forbes) and with good reason. But while some applications work great on the public cloud, others require a private cloud environment, and still others may have to remain on premises. Many of our customers are opting for the on-premises + public cloud hybrid model, and while migrating and managing data across multiple environments does create more complexity, there are new technologies that can tie this diverse and distributed data estate together. Waterline Data, in fact, plays a critical part in automatically discovering, understanding and governing data within a single solution. It’s how we helped GlaxoSmithKline enable the internal sharing of scientific data for faster drug development.

It’s a new cloud-driven and multi-environment world–one that is already bringing about great change to not only enable business and humankind in exciting ways.

Check out the ZDNet article about Parkinson’s UK here.